Andrea Vitaletti

nationality: Italian

date of birth: 27/03/1971

address: via dei Cessati Spiriti 88, Rome, Italy

mobile: +39 349 7569802

e-mail: andrea.vitaletti@uniroma1.it

Short bio

Andrea Vitaletti, Ph.D. in Computer Engineering. I am currently Assistant professor (Ricercatore confermato) with National scientific qualification (09/H1 and 01/B1) as Associate Professor.

My research interests include: networking algorithms and protocols, IoT, private and distributed data management and Distributed Ledger Technologies. I co-authored more than 60 papers

I have been involved in a number of EU projects as researcher, principal investigator and coordinator.

I am a maker and I have some successful experience in transfer of technology: I founded the spin-offs WLAB that has been sold in 2016 and WSENSE where I am the CTO.

I teach networking, data-management and IoT topics at engineering and product design MsC and BsC in Sapienza.

Hobbies: sailing, cycling and paragliding … I play the piano and the guitar for fun… be aware!

Education

From To
Nov. 1998 Jan. 2002 PhD in Engineering in Computer Science (Dottorato di Ingegneria Informatica) (Dottorato di Ricerca in Ingegneria Informatica), University of Rome “La Sapienza”
Oct. 1992 Feb. 1998 MSc in Engineering in Computer Science (Laurea in Ingegneria Informatica), University of Rome “La Sapienza”

Work Experience

From To
Nov. 2007 Now Assistant Professor (Ricercatore) University of Rome “La Sapienza”, National scientific qualification as associate professor in Italian Universities (abilitazione nazionale a professore di seconda fascia. Bando D.D. 1532/2016 settore concorsuale 09/H1 Sistema di Elaborazione delle informazioni e settore concorsuale 01/B1 Informatica)
Jul. 2007 Jun. 2019 Co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer of WSENSE
Jan. 2002 Jul. 2016 Co-founder and Chief Innovation Officer of WLAB (sold in 2016)
Mar. 2002 Oct. 2007 Post-doc and research grant at University of Rome “La Sapienza”
Mar. 1998 Oct. 2007 Senior researcher at ETNOTEAM Research Labs (now NTT DATA)
Mar. 2006 May. 2006 Visiting researcher at Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ), Zurich (Switzerland)
Apr. 2001 Ago. 2001 Consultant at AT&T Labs Research, Florham Park, NJ (USA)

Teaching

Andrea Vitaletti is instructor in the MOOC of Sapienza on Coursera entitled “Recovering the Humankind’s Past and Saving the Universal Heritage”

The teaching activity has been mainly carried out in the Faculty of Information Engineering of Sapienza (Master LM-32 and Laurea L-8) and in the Master in Product Design at Sapienza (LM-12), as summarized in the following table (data from GOMP). Click on the links for the material on the most recent courses.

Year Course Laurea
2017/2018 INTERNET OF THINGS (6 CFU) LM-12
2017/2018 RETI DI CALCOLATORI (3 CFU) L-8
2017/2018 WEB INFORMATION RETRIEVAL (3 CFU) LM-32
2016/2017 INTERNET OF THINGS (6 CFU) LM-12
2016/2017 RETI DI CALCOLATORI (3 CFU) L-8
2015/2016 INTERNET OF THINGS (6 CFU) LM-12
2015/2016 RETI DI CALCOLATORI (3 CFU) L-8
2014/2015 PROGETTO DI RETI E SISTEMI INFORMATICI(3 CFU) L-8
2014/2015 PERVASIVE SYSTEMS (6 CFU) LM-32
2013/2014 PROGETTO DI RETI E SISTEMI INFORMATICI(3 CFU) L-8
2013/2014 WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEMS (6 CFU) LM-32
2012/2013 PROGETTO DI RETI E SISTEMI INFORMATICI(3 CFU) L-8
2012/2013 WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEMS (6 CFU) LM-32
2011/2012 RETI DI CALCOLATORI (6 CFU) L-8
2011/2012 WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEMS (6 CFU) LM-32
2010/2011 SISTEMI PER RETI WIRELESS (6 CFU) LM-32
2009/2010 SISTEMI PER RETI WIRELESS (6 CFU) LM-32
2009/2010 RETI DI CALCOLATORI (6 CFU) L-8
2008/2009 SISTEMI PER RETI WIRELESS (6 CFU) LM-32

Transfer of Technology

From To
2002 2016 In 2002 I founded WLAB, a dynamic SME created to support applied research and prototyping in the area of ​​wireless technologies and pervasive and mobile computing. WLAB has been characterized by the synergy with the universities of Rome (Sapienza and Tor Vergata) promoting a continuous and effective technological transfer of innovative solutions from the academic world to the industry. I was Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of WLAB until its sale in 2016
2012 2019 In 2012 I founded WSENSE a spin-off of Sapienza University of Rome, with a strong and experienced R&D team specialized in monitoring and communication systems with pioneering patented solutions in the Internet of Underwater Things (IoUT). I am currently the CTO of WSENSE and I lead the activities for the development of the WGATE, the cloud platform for the collection, analysis, visualisation and integration of IoT data. WSENSE is an international company, with WSENSE Ltd hosted in the Marine Robotics Innovation Centre di Southampton U.K.
2014 Now Among the organizers of the Google Technologies Workshop for Cloud and Web Development now in its fifth edition. The workshop is aimed at students with the purpose of introducing them to a methodology of application development that is not limited only to technological aspects, but can lead them to the realization of a start-up. The success of the workshop is also measured by the fact that some participants are now hosted in business accelerators
in 2014 Successful experience in a crowd-funding campaign with the project COVA that has been also boradcasted in the Italian main TV channel RAI
in 2001 During his stay at AT&T Research Labs of Florham Park, NJ - USA, his research activity led to the application of four provisional patent applications.
in 2001 (3 months) During his stay at AT&T Research Labs of Florham Park, NJ - USA, his research activity led to the application of four provisional patent applications.

Patents

Projects

I have acquired a significant experience on research projects, gained in more than 15 years of participation to academic and industrial projects characterized in many cases by a marked multidisciplinarity approach. Over time he has assumed various roles, with different responsibilities, as researcher, principal investigator (PI) and finally coordinator. The main projects in which he was involved are briefly described below.

In the following I briefly outline some of the activities performed before

Hardware

Media

Research

The following figure shows the Wordcloud of the abstracts of my papers. After a stemming process, the 50 most frequent terms in the abstracts are shown with a size that is proportional to their frequency.

The most evident terms (i.e. the biggest, namely the more frequent in the abstract) well summarize my research that focus on wireless networks for the collection of data to provide useful services to the users. This activity, is nowadays part of the wider research on the Internet of Things (IoT) and more recently naturally brought me to start an investigation on Decentralized Applications and Blockchain Technologies.

A distinctive characteristics of my research is the attempt to always validate the performance of the proposed solutions, both theoretical and practical, via simulations and real testbeds.

I lead the research activities on wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things, in the research group on Computer Networks and Pervasive Systems of the Department of Automatic Computer Engineering and Management Antonio Ruberti della Sapienza University of Rome (DIAG). In this context, I enjoied the cooperation with several international research organizations, including: Research Academic Computer Technology Institute (Greece), Braunschweig University of Technology (Germany), Universitat Paderborn (Germany), University of Athens (Greece), Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (Israel), University of Salerno (Italy), Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland), Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya (Spain), University of Geneva (Switzerland), University of Lubeck (Germany).

I founded the laboratory on the wireless sensor network of DIAG where the solutions - both hardware and software - designed in the our research activities, are implemented and tested in the field.

I enjoy a long term collaboration on cooperative design and co-design with faculties of the MSc in Product Design at Sapienza. In particular, I’m leading the research activities on the employment of genetic algorithms for product design.

Wireless Networks for the Collection of Data

Allocation Problems

Coloring algorithms can be used to model bandwidth allocation problems in FDMA systems. In [1] we present randomized lower bounds for online coloring of some well studied network topologies. Wireless data networks allow multiple codes (or channels) to be allocated to a single user, where each code can support multiple data rates. Providing fine-grained QoS to users in such networks poses the two-dimensional challenge of assigning both power (rate) and codes to every user [2],[3]. A similar “two-dimensional challenge” emerges in the allocation of bandwidth slots to communication requests on a satellite channel under real time constraints. Accepted requests must be scheduled on non-intersecting rectangles in the time/bandwidth Cartesian space with the goal of maximizing the benefit obtained from accepted requests. [4]

Data collection and energy consumption

Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) are made of battery powered nodes, consequently the energy consumption of the nodes must be optimized to increase the network life-time. WSN are deployed to monitor a phenomenon and in a very simplistic setting we can identify two main phases: a) the interest dissemination, where the nodes are notified on the phenomenon they have to observe, and b) the data collection where the nodes report the observed data. In [5],[6] we tackle the problem of designing simple, localized, low energy consuming, reliable protocols for one-to-all communication (namely the main paradigm for interest-dissemination) in large scale wireless sensor networks. Data aggregation can be used to combine data of several sensors into a single message, thus reducing sensor communication costs during the data collection phase, at the expense of message delays. Thus, the main problem of data aggregation is to balance the communication and delay costs [7],[8],[9],[10]. In [11], [12], [13] we presented solutions capable to integrate the data delivery and interest dissemination techniques. Duty cycling is a useful technique that alternates active and inactive periods to reduce the power consumption. In [14] we presented a protocol capable to automatically adapt the duty-cycle to the application needs. The protocol has been also tested to extend TETRA, a European standard for a trunked radio system, with WSNs [15].

Delay Tolerant Networks (DTNs) exploit user mobility to deliver messages. In [16],[17],[18],[19],[20],][21] we propose a a reference architecture and a thorough quantitative evaluation of routing protocols for DTNs. Population protocols are used as a theoretical model for a collection (or population) of tiny mobile agents that interact with one another to carry out a computation. In [22] we evaluate the performance of population protocols on real face-to-face social networks of mobile users [25]. In [26] we studied how to exploit the energy scavenged by the pedestrian movements to enhance the operation time of the sensors. In [27],[28] we studied how to enhance the capabilities of multi-robot surveillance with WSNs.

Simulation, Tools, Deployments and Devices

The workflow for the deployment of a WSN usually foresees a preliminary simulation of the proposed solution to assess its performance. In this context, a key question is the validity of the simulation results. In [29],[30],[31],[32] we compared the simulation results with the ones obtained in a real test-bed. The debugging of WSN can be a labor-intensive and cumbersome task. In [33] we present a tool, basically a distributed network sniffer alongside the inspected sensor network. The ability of re-programming over-the-air (OTA) the nodes is crucial to fix bugs or enhance the functionalities on the nodes. Usually, OTA assume an always-on network. In [34] we presented a protocol capable to support OTA in network with a duty-cycle. In our lab on WSNs we developed the MagoNode [35], an embedded system based on a highly efficient RF front-end that greatly improves RF performance, in terms of radio range and sensibility, still limiting energy consumption. Indeed, the device outperforms other existing amplified platforms available on the market and is comparable to most commonly known unamplified motes. A network of cooperating tiny artifacts requires new programming models [36]. In [37] we explored the novel concept of virtual sensor networks, namely WSNs capable to adapt their behavior according to the user needs. the Internet of Underwater Things is probably the new frontier of WSNs. In [38] we presented the system to access the SUNRISE federation of facilities to test solutions for the Internet of Underwater Things. In [39] we started the investigation on the employment of WSNs to monitor critical infrastructures. This activity has been further developed in [40] where we presented the work done to monitor the structural health of a Rome B1 underground construction site by a WSNs. In [41],[42] a WSN has been used for noise pollution monitoring.

Plant as sensors

I have been the coordinator of the EU Future and Emerging Technologies (FET) project PLEASED. The aim of the project was the development of a technology capable of exploiting the plants as bio-sensors. In other words, PLEASED was an attempt to develop a kind interface between plants and computers, namely a plant-cyborg. Indeed, plants react to some external stimuli generating an electrical signal that can be captured by suitable devices (similarly to what happens in EMG). The main problem here is to develop a technology capable to uniquely identify the applied stimuli from the observed electrical signals. The idea of using plants as sensing devices has been first presented in [43]. In [44],[45],[46],[47] a number of machine learning techniques has been evaluated to classify the electrical signal generated by plants in response to heterogeneous stimuli. The main goal of this research was to identify a fingerprint in those electrical responses capable of discriminating the applied stimuli; this is indeed the main build block of a future employment of plants as bio-sensors.

Services to the Users

Localization

During my stay in AT&T research lab in USA I had the opportunity of conducting a pioneering experimental activity on Cell-ID location techniques [48],[49] that also resulted in the application of of three provisional patents.

Privacy

We initially considered the issues related to the implementation of state-of-the-art cryptographic primitives on resource constrained devices [50], [51] and mobile environments [52] Then we focused on the development of technical solutions capable to balance the tradeoff between the privacy of the users and the utility of the offered services [53], [54], [55], [56]. Current approaches in digital trials entail that private user data are provisioned to the trial investigator that is considered a trusted party. The aim of [57] is to present the technical requirements and the research challenges to secure the flow and control of personal data and to protect the interests of all the involved parties during the first phases of a clinical trial, namely the characterization of the potential patients and their possible recruitment. The proposed architecture will let the individuals keep their data private during these phases while providing a useful sketch of their data to the investigator. More recently, we started a research activity on blockchain technologies. This activity is focused on two main directions: a) the development of interesting use-cases to prove the applicability of such technology beyond the financial domain; in particular we used blockchain technologies to guarantee the quality of data in IoT based clinical trials [58] and to support the democratization of the decision processes in the smart cities [59]), b) the development of suitable software engineering techniques to reduce the risks in the development of decentralized applications [60].

Recommendation systems

Searching is probably the main functionality of the Web. In [61] we performed an experimental study of pre-fetching and caching algorithms for the world wide web. However, in modern applications recommendation systems play an equally important role taking advantage of Big Data to deliver personalized recommendations based on a visitor’s previous activities and those of other similar customers. Usually recommendation systems rely on centralized architectures. In [62],[63],[64], [65] we investigate the effectiveness of fully decentralized, collaborative filtering techniques. In [56] we propose a decentralized system capable to recommend new friendships to other users. In our proposal, the information needed to perform recommendation is collected and exchanged between users in a privacy preserving way.

Other services

The participation to the EU project CHIRON allowed us to understand the main components of a Next-Generation Remote Healthcare [66]. Also on the basis of this experience, we developed a simple system to deliver elder-care environments utilizing TV-channel based mechanisms [67]. The UX is also the main concept explored in [68] where we investigated an a ubiquitous touch-based remote grocery shopping process.

In [69],[70] we explored the concept of cooperative design supported by genetic algorithm. The selection of the products that will actually take part to the evolutionary process, relies on crowdsourcing mechanisms: only the most appreciated products survive.

Bibliography

A likely more recent list of my publications can be found in:

[1] S. Leonardi and A. Vitaletti, “Randomized lower bounds for online path coloring,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 1518, pp. 232–247, 1998.

[2] L. Becchetti, S. Diggavi, S. Leonardi, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, S. Muthukrishnan, T. Nandagopal, and A. Vitaletti, “Parallel scheduling problems in next generation wireless networks.” pp. 238–247, 2002.

[3] L. Becchetti, S. Leonardi, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, A. Vitaletti, S. Diggavi, S. Muthukrishnan, and T. Nandagopal, “Parallel scheduling problems in next generation wireless networks,” Networks, vol. 45, no. 1, pp. 9–22, 2005.

[4] S. Leonardi, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, and A. Vitaletti, “Approximation algorithms for bandwidth and storage allocation problems under real time constraints,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 1974, pp. 409–420, 2000.

[5] L. Orecchia, A. Panconesi, C. Petrioli, and A. Vitaletti, “Localized techniques for broadcasting in wireless sensor networks.” pp. 41–51, 2004.

[6] D. Dubhashi, O. Häggström, L. Orecchia, A. Panconesi, C. Petrioli, and A. Vitaletti, “Localized techniques for broadcasting in wireless sensor networks,” Algorithmica (New York), vol. 49, no. 4, pp. 412–446, 2007.

[7] P. Korteweg, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, L. Stougie, and A. Vitaletti, “Data aggregation in sensor networks: Balancing communication and delay costs,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 4474 LNCS, pp. 139–150, 2007.

[8] P. Korteweg, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, L. Stougie, and A. Vitaletti, “Data aggregation in sensor networks: Balancing communication and delay costs,” Theoretical Computer Science, vol. 410, no. 14, pp. 1346–1354, 2009.

[9] L. Becchetti, P. Korteweg, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, M. Skutella, L. Stougie, and A. Vitaletti, “Latency constrained aggregation in sensor networks,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 4168 LNCS, pp. 88–99, 2006.

[10] L. Becchetti, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, A. Vitaletti, P. Korteweg, M. Skutella, and L. Stougie, “Latency-constrained aggregation in sensor networks,” ACM Transactions on Algorithms, vol. 6, no. 1, 2009.

[11] A. Marcucci, M. Nati, C. Petrioli, and A. Vitaletti, “Directed diffusion light: Low overhead data dissemination in wireless sensor networks,” vol. 4. pp. 2538–2545, 2005.

[12] M. Mastrogiovanni, C. Petrioli, M. Rossi, A. Vitaletti, and M. Zorzi, “Integrated data delivery and interest dissemination techniques for wireless sensor networks.” 2006.

[13] M. Mastrogiovanni, C. Petrioli, M. Rossi, A. Vitaletti, and M. Zorzi, “Integrated Data Delivery and Interest Dissemination Techniques for Wireless Sensor Networks,” in GLOBECOM 2006 - 2006 IEEE GLOBAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS CONFERENCE.

[14] U. Colesanti, S. Santini, and A. Vitaletti, “DISSense: An adaptive ultralow-power communication protocol for wireless sensor networks.” 2011.

[15] M. Paoli, F. Ficarola, U. M. Colesanti, A. Vitaletti, S. Citrigno, and D. Sacca, “Extending tetra with wireless sensor networks,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT ENGINEERING INFORMATICS, vol. 3, nos. 2-3, SI, pp. 225–243, 2015.

[16] K. Massri, A. Vernata, and A. Vitaletti, “Routing protocols for delay tolerant networks: A quantitative evaluation.” pp. 107–114, 2012.

[17] D. Amendola, F. De Rango, K. Massri, and A. Vitaletti, “Neighbor discovery in delay tolerant networking using resource-constraint devices.” 2013.

[18] K. Massri, R. Beraldi, and A. Vitaletti, “Erasure-coding based data delivery in delay tolerant networks,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 8121 LNCS, pp. 188–200, 2013.

[19] K. Massri and A. Vitaletti, “DTN routing protocols on resource constrained devices: Design, implementation and first experiments.” 2013.

[20] D. Amendola, F. De Rango, K. Massri, and A. Vitaletti, “Efficient neighbor discovery in rfid based devices over resource-constrained dtn networks.” pp. 3842–3847, 2014.

[21] K. Massri, A. Vitaletti, A. Vernata, and I. Chatzigiannakis, “Routing protocols for delay tolerant networks: A reference architecture and a thorough quantitative evaluation,” JOURNAL OF SENSOR AND ACTUATOR NETWORKS, vol. 5, no. 2, Jun. 2016.

[22] L. Becchetti, L. Bergamini, F. Ficarola, and A. Vitaletti, “Population protocols on real social networks.” 2012.

[23] L. Becchetti, L. Bergamini, F. Ficarola, and A. Vitaletti, “Population protocols on real social networks.” pp. 17–24, 2012.

[24] L. Becchetti, L. Bergamini, F. Ficarola, F. Salvatore, and A. Vitaletti, “First experiences with the implementation and evaluation of population protocols on physical devices.” pp. 335–342, 2012.

[25] F. Ficarola and A. Vitaletti, “Capturing interactions in face-to-face social networks.” pp. 613–620, 2015.

[26] I. Chatzigiannakis, U. Colesanti, S. Kontogiannis, G. Leshem, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, J. Mehler, G. Persiano, P. Spirakis, and A. Vitaletti, “MURPESS - multi radio pedestrian energy scavenging sensor network.” 2010.

[27] A. Pennisi, F. Previtali, F. Ficarola, D. Bloisi, L. Iocchi, and A. Vitaletti, “Distributed sensor network for multi-robot surveillance,” vol. 32. pp. 1095–1100, 2014.

[28] A. Pennisi, F. Previtali, C. Gennari, D. Bloisi, L. Iocchi, F. Ficarola, A. Vitaletti, and D. Nardi, “Multi-robot surveillance through a distributed sensor network,” Studies in Computational Intelligence, vol. 604, pp. 77–98, 2015.

[29] U. Colesanti, C. Crociani, and A. Vitaletti, “On the accuracy of omnet++ in the wireless sensor networks domain: Simulation vs. Testbed.” pp. 25–31, 2007.

[30] U. M. Colesanti, C. Crociani, and A. Vitaletti, “On the Accuracy of OMNeT plus plus in the Wireless Sensor Networks Domain: Simulation vs. Testbed,” in PE-WASUN’07: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FOURTH ACM WORKSHOP ON PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF WIRELESS AD HOC, SENSOR, AND UBIQUITOUS NETWORKS, pp. 25–31.

[31] L. Bergamini, C. Crociani, A. Vitaletti, and M. Nati, “Validation of wsn simulators through a comparison with a real testbed.” pp. 103–104, 2010.

[32] C. Petrioli, C. Pierascenzi, and A. Vitaletti, “Bluetooth scatternet formation performance: Simulations vs. Testbeds.” 2007.

[33] M. Ringwald, K. Römer, and A. Vitaletti, “Passive inspection of sensor networks,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 4549 LNCS, pp. 205–222, 2007.

[34] A. Di Cagno, M. Paoli, U. Colesanti, and A. Vitaletti, “REACTIVE: A peaceful coexistence between deluge and low power listening.” pp. 137–142, 2014.

[35] M. Paoli, A. Lo Russo, U. Colesanti, and A. Vitaletti, “MagoNode: Advantages of rf front-ends in wireless sensor networks,” Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, vol. 281 LNEE, pp. 125–137, 2014.

[36] S. Santini, K. Roemer, P. Couderc, P. Marrón, D. Minder, T. Voigt, and A. Vitaletti, “System architectures and programming models,” in Cooperating embedded systems and wireless sensor networks, ISTE, 2010, pp. 347–404.

[37] P. Karkazis, P. Trakadas, T. Zahariadis, I. Chatzigiannakis, M. Dohler, A. Vitaletti, A. Antoniou, H. C. Leligou, and L. Sarakis, “Resource and service virtualisation in m2m and iot platforms,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT ENGINEERING INFORMATICS, vol. 3, nos. 2-3, SI, pp. 205–224, 2015.

[38] C. Petrioli, R. Petroccia, D. Spaccini, A. Vitaletti, T. Arzilli, D. Lamanna, A. Galizial, and E. Renzi, “The sunrise gate: Accessing the sunrise federation of facilities to test solutions for the internet of underwater things.” 2014.

[39] L. Filipponi, A. Vitaletti, G. Landi, V. Memeo, G. Laura, and P. Pucci, “Smart city: An event driven architecture for monitoring public spaces with heterogeneous sensors.” pp. 281–286, 2010.

[40] U. Colesanti, A. Russo, M. Paoli, C. Petrioli, and A. Vitaletti, “Poster abstract: Structural health monitoring in an underground construction site: The roman experience.” 2013.

[41] S. Santini, B. Ostermaier, and A. Vitaletti, “First experiences using wireless sensor networks for noise pollution monitoring.” pp. 61–65, 2008.

[42] L. Filipponi, S. Santini, and A. Vitaletti, “Data collection in wireless sensor networks for noise pollution monitoring,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 5067 LNCS, pp. 492–497, 2008.

[43] V. Manzella, C. Gaz, A. Vitaletti, E. Masi, L. Santopolo, S. Mancuso, D. Salazar, and J. De Las Heras, “Demo abstract: Plants as sensing devices: The pleased experience.” 2013.

[44] S. Chatterjee, S. Ghosh, S. Das, V. Manzella, A. Vitaletti, E. Masi, L. Santopolo, S. Mancuso, and K. Maharatna, “Forward and inverse modelling approaches for prediction of light stimulus from electrophysiological response in plants,” Measurement: Journal of the International Measurement Confederation, vol. 53, pp. 101–116, 2014.

[45] S. Chatterjee, S. Das, K. Maharatna, E. Masi, L. Santopolo, S. Mancuso, and A. Vitaletti, “Exploring strategies for classification of external stimuli using statistical features of the plant electrical response,” Journal of the Royal Society Interface, vol. 12, no. 104, 2015.

[46] S. Das, B. Ajiwibawa, S. Chatterjee, S. Ghosh, K. Maharatna, S. Dasmahapatra, A. Vitaletti, E. Masi, and S. Mancuso, “Drift removal in plant electrical signals via iir filtering using wavelet energy,” Computers and Electronics in Agriculture, vol. 118, pp. 15–23, 2015.

[47] S. Chatterjee, S. Das, K. Maharatna, E. Masi, L. Santopolo, I. Colzi, S. Mancuso, and A. Vitaletti, “Comparison of decision tree based classification strategies to detect external chemical stimuli from raw and filtered plant electrical response,” Sensors and Actuators, B: Chemical, vol. 249, pp. 278–295, 2017.

[48] R. Jana, T. Johnson, S. Muthukrishnan, and A. Vitaletti, “Location based services in a wireless wan using cellular digital packet data (cdpd).” pp. 74–80, 2001.

[49] E. Trevisani and A. Vitaletti, “Cell-id location technique, limits and benefits: An experimental study.” pp. 51–60, 2004.

[50] A. Vitaletti and G. Palombizio, “Rijndael for sensor networks: Is speed the main issue?” Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science, vol. 171, no. SPEC. ISS., pp. 71–81, 2007.

[51] I. Chatzigiannakis, A. Vitaletti, and A. Pyrgelis, “A privacy-preserving smart parking system using an iot elliptic curve based security platform,” Computer Communications, vols. 89-90, pp. 165–177, 2016.

[52] M. Di Zenise, A. Vitaletti, and D. Argles, “A user-centric approach to eCertificate for electronic identities (eIDs) management in mobile environment.” pp. 198–203, 2011.

[53] L. Bergamini, L. Becchetti, and A. Vitaletti, “Privacy-preserving environment monitoring in networks of mobile devices,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6827 LNCS, pp. 179–191, 2011.

[54] L. Becchetti, L. Filipponi, and A. Vitaletti, “Privacy support in people-centric sensing,” Journal of Communications, vol. 7, no. SPL.ISS. 8, pp. 606–621, 2012.

[55] E. Baglioni, L. Becchetti, L. Bergamini, U. Colesanti, L. Filipponi, A. Vitaletti, and G. Persiano, “A lightweight privacy preserving sms-based recommendation system for mobile users.” pp. 191–198, 2010.

[56] L. Becchetti, L. Bergamini, U. Colesanti, L. Filipponi, G. Persiano, and A. Vitaletti, “A lightweight privacy preserving sms-based recommendation system for mobile users,” Knowledge and Information Systems, vol. 40, no. 1, pp. 49–77, 2014.

[57] F. Angeletti, I. Chatzigiannakis, and A. Vitaletti, “Towards an architecture to guarantee both data privacy and utility in the first phases of digital clinical trials,” Sensors, vol. 18, no. 12, 2018.

[58] F. Angeletti, I. Chatzigiannakis, and A. Vitaletti, “The role of blockchain and IoT in recruiting participants for digital clinical trials,” in 2017 25TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SOFTWARE, TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND COMPUTER NETWORKS (SOFTCOM), pp. 427–431.

[59] A. Bracciali, I. Chatzigiannakis, and A. Vitaletti, “Citizens Vote to Act: smart contracts for the management of water resources in smart cities.” in First International Conference on Societal Automation. To Appear.

[60] M. Zecchini, A. Bracciali, I. Chatzigiannakis, and A. Vitaletti, “Smart Contract Design Patterns: a use case on water management.” in FPDAPP 2019 2nd International Workshop On Future Perspective of Decentralized Applications. To Appear.

[61] M. Curcio, S. Leonardi, and A. Vitaletti, “An experimental study of prefetching and caching algorithms for the world wide web,” Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 2409, pp. 71–85, 2002.

[62] L. Becchetti, U. Colesanti, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, and A. Vitaletti, “Self-adaptive recommendation systems: Models and experimental analysis.” pp. 479–480, 2008.

[63] L. Becchetti, U. Colesanti, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, and A. Vitaletti, “Recommending items in pervasive scenarios: Models and experimental analysis,” Knowledge and Information Systems, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 555–578, 2011.

[64] L. Becchetti, U. Colesanti, A. Marchetti-Spaccamela, and A. Vitaletti, “Fully decentralized recommendations in pervasive systems: Models and experimental analysis,” Engineering Intelligent Systems, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 161–170, 2012.

[65] I. Chatzigiannakis, G. Mylonas, and A. Vitaletti, “Urban pervasive applications: Challenges, scenarios and case studies,” Computer Science Review, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 103–118, 2011.

[66] A. Vitaletti and S. Puglia, “System overview of next-generation remote healthcare,” in Systems design for remote healthcare, K. Maharatna and S. Bonfiglio, Eds. New York, NY: Springer New York, 2014, pp. 31–53.

[67] D. Amaxilatis, I. Chatzigiannakis, I. Mavrommati, E. Vasileiou, and A. Vitaletti, “Delivering elder-care environments utilizing tv-channel based mechanisms,” Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 783–798, 2017.

[68] I. Cappiello, S. Puglia, and A. Vitaletti, “Design and initial evaluation of a ubiquitous touch-based remote grocery shopping process.” pp. 9–14, 2009.

[69] A. Vitaletti, “GENDE: GENetic design best products evolve according to users feedback,” Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering, vol. 413, pp. 101–110, 2017.

[70] A. Vitaletti, I. Chatzigiannakis, V. Malakuczi, and I. Mavrommati, “A Case of Genetic Algorithms Supporting the Design of Collaboratively Shaped, Genetically Evolving, Products,” in First International Conference on Societal Automation. To Appear.